Theresa Bank and the City Directories

This post is the last one that I have planned for the Bank family. As was stated in a earlier post, I found Theresa (or Clarissa, whichever is her real name) living with her parents and sisters in the 1860 and 1870 censuses. She was married in May of 1887 to John J Eck. So where was she in the 1880 census?

I found Theresa living as a domestic in the household of Samuel Crantz. Crantz was a tailor living in Williamsport, Lycoming, Pennsylvania. I also found Theresa's sisters, Mary, Annie, and Catharine, also living in Williamsport and working as domestics.

Then I began searching the Williamsport city directories for the girls. In 1877, I found Mary. In 1879, I found Annie, Kate and Mary. In 1881, I found Kate, Mary and Theresa. In 1883, I found Kate, Mary and Theresa. In 1886, I found Theresa. In 1887, 1888, and 1890, I found Maggie working as a dress maker in South Williamsport. The professions of the rest of the girls is always listed as domestic.

Then I decided to find out who was employing Theresa. In 1881, Teresa is living at 9 Market. This is the home of James J Gibson. He owns D. S. Andrus & Co. and Ring, Cable & Co. It also lists him as a ticket agent for P. & E. R. R (Pennsylvania and Erie Railroad), but I think that is a mistake because if he owned two companies, why would he work as a ticket agent? Below are the ads and directory listings for Gibson's two companies.

In 1883, Theresa is still living and working for James Gibson at 9 Market. He is no longer listed as a ticket agent, furthering my theory that the 1881 directory was incorrect. Now he is also the owner of the Williamsport Wagon Co. instead of Ring, Cable, & Co. According to the ad below, the company changed names.


In 1886, Theresa is now the domestic at 111 Market. This is the residence of George Carter, hostler. I could not find out anything about Carter's hotel in the directory.

The city directory paints an interesting picture of Theresa's life before she got married. It must have been interesting to work for different people who were very sucessful it seems. It was probably also very hard work.

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